As most of us get excited about 2017, there’s one thing we’ll miss in the New Year…The Obamas in The White House.

President Obama reminds us of how much we’ll miss him in office with a touching farewell message posted on social media.

 

My farewell address
In 1796, as George Washington set the precedent for a peaceful, democratic transfer of power, he also set a precedent by penning a farewell address to the American people. And over the 220 years since, many American presidents have followed his lead.
On Tuesday, January 10, I’ll go home to Chicago to say my grateful farewell to you, even if you can’t be there in person.
I’m just beginning to write my remarks. But I’m thinking about them as a chance to say thank you for this amazing journey, to celebrate the ways you’ve changed this country for the better these past eight years, and to offer some thoughts on where we all go from here.
Since 2009, we’ve faced our fair share of challenges, and come through them stronger. That’s because we have never let go of a belief that has guided us ever since our founding — our conviction that, together, we can change this country for the better.
So I hope you’ll join me one last time.
Because, for me, it’s always been about you.

 

 

 

On Monday, President Obama announced a ban on solitary confinement for juvenile offenders in the federal prison system, saying the practice is overused and has the potential for devastating psychological consequences.

President Obama also outlined a series of executive actions, prohibiting federal corrections officials from punishing prisoners who commit “low-level infractions” with solitary confinement.

The president recently released a statement on his decision

“In 2010, a 16-year-old named Kalief Browder from the Bronx was accused of stealing a backpack. He was sent to Rikers Island to await trial, where he reportedly endured unspeakable violence at the hands of inmates and guards — and spent nearly two years in solitary confinement.

In 2013, Kalief was released, having never stood trial. He completed a successful semester at Bronx Community College. But life was a constant struggle to recover from the trauma of being locked up alone for 23 hours a day. One Saturday, he committed suicide at home. He was just 22 years old.

Solitary confinement gained popularity in the United States in the early 1800s, and the rationale for its use has varied over time. Today, it’s increasingly overused on people such as Kalief, with heartbreaking results — which is why my administration is taking steps to address this problem.

There are as many as 100,000 people held in solitary confinement in U.S. prisons — including juveniles and people with mental illnesses. As many as 25,000 inmates are serving months, even years of their sentences alone in a tiny cell, with almost no human contact.”

President Obama gets a gold star for this!

bluestar

Mental illness is never considered when putting these inmates in such  inhumane situations. The effects could be detrimental to an already troubled soul.

Read more on this story here

2015 has been a great year for Kendrick Lamar. Not only because of his successful sophomore studio LP, To Pimp A Butterfly and the news of his eleven Grammy nominations.

This Hip Hop artist got to meet with President Obama in the oval office!

According to The Hill, Kendrick had an opportunity to meet with the president in October when he was in Washington to perform at the Kennedy Center with the National Symphony Orchestra.

Senior adviser Valerie Jarrett said that Lamar and President Barack Obama had shared a conversation in the Oval Office.

“You know what the president said to him? [Because] he was a little nervous — bless his heart, he’s really a very nice young man, and the president said, ‘Can you believe that we’re both sitting in this Oval Office?’” Jarrett said.

 

Obama once told People Magazine that “How Much a Dollar Cost” is his favorite track!

When Hip Hop artists and the commander-in-chief meets… You know Hip Hop has come a long way.

That’s GOTTA inspire the young black boys/girls in our urban cities!

The Kendrick-narrated PSA below reveals the discussion he and President Obama had about the problems and solutions of the inner cities. The PSA is for President Obama’s initiative, My Brother’s Keeper. In the minute-long clip, directed by Dave Meyers and The Little Homies, Kendrick becomes a mentor to the youth.

“If it helps the next kid become a better person in life, I will forever be aware of my influence and pay it forward,” he says.

From Compton to the White House. I can dig it!