With the endless amount of hair inspiration for black women all over the internet and magazines, it was only a matter of time before an app would be a part of the equation. It took three brilliant women to come together with the unique idea to create an app for hair inspiration for black women. Whether you’re relaxed, natural, long, short, or loc’d, the app, ‘Tress’, has all the ideas and tips provided by the app’s members that you could use.

Via The Root:

Three black software engineers and entrepreneurs—Cassandra Sarfo, Esther Olatunde and Priscilla Hazel—have created ‘Tress’, an app they hope will become the one-stop shop for all your black hair needs, inspirations and appointments.

“We do this all the time: We see a hairstyle that we like. We stop people on the street just to ask them where they did their hair, how much it cost them, or ask them for their stylist’s number,” Hazel told The Root. “And my mom, she takes pictures of her TV screen and [messages] me and asks me where she can have it done. It’s a habit that we have that we do all the time.”

So the women put their heads together to come up with a solution for what they saw as an obvious demand, and the app Tress was born. The long-term goal is to make Tress a one-stop shop for all things hair, and for the platform to be a seamless integration between someone seeing a hairstyle and knowing all the products and procedures (and even people!) used to create it.

Currently on the app, women can find hair inspo and filter hairstyles by the type they’re looking for, or even by cost. Women can also upload and share photos of their own hairstyle, adding whatever information is necessary, and contribute to community discussions about best hair-care practices and other tips. You can see what’s trending, and even bookmark hairstyles for later viewing.

The women behind the app hope that within the next six to eight months, users will be able to purchase products through the app directly. A little further into the future, the next priority will be enabling women to book hairstylists. 

Read full article here

 

Dopeness

When we browse Youtube for makeup tutorials, we typically look for artists in our age range, because they’re more experienced, right?

Well, Aliyah Muse has definitely proven that age ain’t nothin’ but a number! Aliyah is a Youtube and Instagram sensation with makeup skills impressive enough to beat the faces of celebrities. Aliyah’s portfolio can hang with the professionals half her age! She’s even taught her mom how to apply makeup!

artist

I love how she explains in detail the techniques she uses and why, helping those who need help in trying to create a particular look.
Check her out in action below!

She even does special effects makeup!

 

Little mama is great now! By the time she reaches adulthood, no one will be able to touch her!

Meet Black Excellence by the name of Dr. Jedidah Isler, Ph.D.

Dr. Jedidah Isler is an award-winning astrophysicist, TED Fellow, and a nationally recognized speaker and advocate for inclusive STEM education. She is also the creator and host of the monthly web series “Vanguard: Conversations with Women of Color in STEM.”

Dr. Isler received her bachelor’s degree at Norfolk State University’s Dozoretz National Institute for Mathematics and Applied Sciences (DNIMAS) before earning a Masters in Physics from the Fisk-Vanderbilt Master’s-to-Ph.D. Bridge Program, a pioneering effort to increase the attainment of advanced STEM degrees by students of color. Dr. Isler continued her education at Yale University, where her research on supermassive, hyperactive black holes was supported by fellowships from NASA, the National Science Foundation, and the Ford Foundation. In 2014, she became the first African-American woman to receive a Ph.D. in Astrophysics from Yale, completing an award-winning study that examined the physics of particle jets emanating from black holes at the centers of distant galaxies called blazars. Dr. Isler’s current research focuses on using simultaneous infrared, optical and gamma-ray observations to better understand the physics of these blazar jets.

Dr. Isler has served as a Chancellor’s Faculty Fellow at Syracuse University, an affiliate of the Future Faculty Leader Fellowship at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and is currently an National Science Foundation Astronomy & Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellow at Vanderbilt University. She was recognized as a 2015 TED Fellow for her astrophysical research and innovative efforts to inspire a new generation of STEM leaders from underrepresented backgrounds. She has been invited to Astronomy Night at the White House and featured in various publications including Wired, Diversity in Action, Ebony, NPR:CodeSwitch, and The Crisis Magazine. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times.

As a speaker, Dr. Isler works with schools, museums, libraries, and nonprofit organizations across the country to advance the cause of truly inclusive STEM engagement and has established herself as a champion of access and empowerment in STEM education from middle school and beyond.

Just awesome on so many levels!

Source: Jedidahislerphd.com

“I was fighting for every black child in this country.”

Those are the words of the very brave Zulaikha Patel, the 13-year-old South African girl with the natural hair of a goddess! Zulaikha is now a heroine for her country after she started a protest over a discriminatory hair policy at her school.

Zulaikha was repeatedly suspended for her hair by teachers at South Africa’s Pretoria Girls High School …something’s she’s actually had to deal with since primary school. As a result, Patel leads a protest for change in the school’s racially-biased hair policy. According to All Africa, she had to leave three schools because her hair challenged the system. Her sister said she was continually mocked, her hair described as “exotic” and looking like a “cabbage”. She would come home in tears. It is remarkable then that she didn’t look for ways to mend the “problem”.

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The protest included an online petition for a policy change which gained thousands of signatures. Zulaikha and fellow schoolmates of Pretoria Girls’ High school became involved in a tense standoff with private security guards as they threatened the students with arrest. The protest, which sparked national attention, has garnered support from all over.

“The issue of my hair has been a thing that’s followed me my entire life, even in Primary I was told my hair is not natural, it’s exotic, my Afro was not wanted or anything like that and then the issue followed me to high school, Patel told CNN.
Pretoria Girls’ Code of Conduct does not specifically mention Afros, but it does lay out rules for general appearance, including prescribing that all styles “should be conservative, neat and in keeping with the school uniform.”

This little girl was put in an adult position to fight a system that forces her to conform to their standards. All she wants is the right to wear her natural hair. A 13-year-old, who should be focused on doing things 13-year-olds do, took weeks to study the school’s “code of conduct”, according to her sister. She also studied human rights, including rights for children, so she could be prepared to fight a system who uses their racist practices to limit this young, care-free black girl’s freedom to be herself.

This is a child who has to emotionally suffer from having to sacrifice her individuality for an education. I’ll dare ANYONE to disregard the blatant racism these students are dealing with.

She’s taking on a lot for someone her age, but guess what? She’s the epitome of a person with courage by standing up for what she believes in…human rights. A lot of us adults could learn from her.

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