Girlfriends…Living Single…Martin…Insecure…Waiting To Exhale…Girls Trip

What does all of these have in common?

They all have gone above and beyond to display black women and their friendships in a more positive light. Let’s forget about the ratchet reality shows that make black women look bad, and focus on the good the aforementioned projects have done for women of color.

Like I say here, it makes life easier for us if we take the time to understand what Sisterhood is really about and how we can implement it in our daily lives. Whether we want to believe it or not, we need each other. We have to inspire, motivate and uplift one another because we are a part of a society that tells us that we don’t. We (black women) are generally perceived as bitches/angry women with bad attitudes. Shows like ‘Living Single’ and films like ‘Girls Trip’ diminish the perception that black women cannot get along. I’m thankful for creators of shows mentioned who use their creativity to conceptualize sisterhood on screen the way it should be.

I have something to share…I’ve had a valuable lesson in sisterhood recently that has made me see myself in a different light. It made me evaluate my circle for what it used to be and visualize my friendships for how they are now. Despite the fictional storylines of ‘Girls Trip’, ‘Living Single’ and ‘Insecure’, women like me can use them as templates and apply what we’ve learned to our own friendships. As entertaining as it is to y’all, a toxic episode of ‘Basketball Wives’ could NEVER!!!!

I applaud these films and television shows that depict wonderful friendships among women of color. Not only for my love to see us displayed with warmth, but there weren’t many film and television projects that depicted us in such a way. Let’s get serious here! At one point, we’ve had MANY shows like ‘Friends’ and films like ‘Sex In The City’. Despite the enjoyment those projects gave us, none of the characters looked like us. Additionally, ratchet reality shows with women of color ripping each other’s weaves off, were making a killing in ratings and still are to this day.

 

Despite the few quarrels and disputes the characters have had, ‘Girlfriends’ was that groundbreaking successful show that depicts women of color who kept the love going for the sake of sisterhood.

 

 

Gina and Pam from ‘Martin’ were the epitome of bestfriendism. Despite the animosity between Gina’s man and her bestie, their friendship stayed solid! I guess their on-screen chemistry was solid because they’ve been besties in real life for years.

Despite their different upbringing and differences, Whitley and Kim from ‘A Different World’ displayed a friendship full of support and devotion. Even throughout their many squabbles, their sisterly bond remained intact.

 

Sisterhood is essential to the lives of women, especially women of color. Let’s be honest…could we really reach our highest potential in womanhood without sisterhood? Sisterhood, I believe, is the foundation of our support system. film and television shows that depict black women friendships in a more positive light remind us of that. Those projects reflect what real life friendships among black women supposed to look like.

I’m grateful for the reminder

The Legends Ball, which was inspired by Oprah Winfrey’s desire to pay homage to those before her, gave me many levels of inspiration and generous amounts of motivation. To see all of those beautiful talented black women under one roof was beyond amazing. I only wish I could have been a part of such a historical event.

The blessing behind all of this is that Oprah was able to honor women such as Coretta Scott-King, Maya Angelou, and Ruby Dee before their untimely death.  Watching this momentous celebration, I felt proud.

Although I have yet to do anything much profound and awarded for such as these ladies, I felt proud to be a black woman doing what she love…writing. Oprah’s Legends reminded me to keep on keeping on and never quit. They’ve reminded me to stay proud of who I am, my talent, determination and will to become better while celebrating the next sistah before and after me.

Whatever ambition we carry and whatever goal we set ourselves to achieve is created from the fire in our hearts. Oprah’s legends remind me that the only way we lose that fire is believing that no one will appreciate what we’re striving to do or become. We all have at least one person who is rooting for us, observing us, and look up to as inspiration. That’s all we need to keep going. That one person could be your daughter, your mother, your sister, or that young lady you’d never thought was paying any attention to you.

Oprah’s legends also remind me of how soulful, powerful, strong, beautiful, and talented black women are. No matter what the music and film industry does to undermine the beauty and talent of the black woman, we’ll always admire our singers, actresses, authors, journalists, dancers, and political leaders before us and after us. Their boldness led them to enhance their God-given talent, so they could share them with the world. I’m pretty sure they’ve all came across a few doubters and naysayers during their journey. Obviously, they didn’t let them stop their journey, or they wouldn’t have been invited to the Legend’s Ball, sitting with the likes of Diana Ross, Maya Angelou, Angela Bassett, Leontyne Price, Michelle Obama, and so many countless women we’ve all admired from entertainment, literature, and politics.

Although I wasn’t there, Oprah’s Legends Ball left me wanting to do more, to be more, to become better by enhancing any God-given talent I have.

Just like Oprah celebrated her sistahs, I’ll continue to celebrate my sistahs who are all doing the damn thing!

If you have 40 minutes to spare, please watch the events of Oprah’s Legends Ball.

 

 

 

ELLE recently published a featured article on these beautiful women, and I was so intrigued and inspired, I had to share the story.

It’s awesome when ANYONE starts a business. It’s fantastic when the business owner is a woman. It’s sensational when the business owner is a woman of color! This story of three African-American women who started a law firm together makes me prouder of my people!

Because one woman, Yonde Morris, decided to step out on faith, she and her friends Keli Knight and Jessica Riddick, are working for themselves and guess what…they used the social media giant, Twitter, to help turn their dream into fruition.

By Elle:

Every business has its Hollywood origin story—the wee-hours revelation, the “Eureka!” moment, the so-crazy-it-just-might-work experiment. But the tale that the partners of the African-American- and female-owned KMR Law Group like to tell isn’t some blockbuster epic. It’s made of about 140 characters and one very consequential tweet.

“I had been doing some work that I definitely didn’t love,” explains Yondi K. Morris, a founding partner of KMR. “Technically, I was a contract attorney, which means I went into law firms to help them with whatever they needed for some period of time.” Newly installed at a law firm that she is too polite to shame, she was on the clock when a partner went over to check in on her progress.

“He just looked at me and said, ‘Okay, slave, get back to work.'” She was the only person of color in the room. “I looked around and just waited for someone to catch my eye,” she remembers. No one met her gaze. Worse still, no one looked surprised.

“For me, honestly, I wasn’t just insulted as an African-American woman. I didn’t want to be viewed as a worker bee anymore.” She went home and logged on and tweeted, “I need to start my own firm.” Keli L. Knight wasted no time. She replied right away, writing, “Let’s meet to discuss.” They did, and invited Jessica Reddick, an old friend that Morris had known for a decade, to join. “We got together one day in Starbucks and that was the first meeting,” Morris says. “We just all clicked—our personalities, our dreams, our ambitions. In that moment, it all made sense.” Adrenaline and caffeine flowing, they sketched out a provisional logo on scrap paper and drafted an informal business plan to start a law firm in Chicago. “We decided we were going to do it,” Morris says, “and haven’t looked back since.”

Read more here

 

See what happens when you step out on faith?

These three sistahs are making it all happen for themselves.

I knew Twitter would be good for something!!

Check out the website for more information on KMR Law Group here

%d bloggers like this: